• Tag Archives Conventions
  • Where Projects Stand a Couple of Weeks into 2020

    January whiteboard
    Part of the whiteboard listing projects and deadlines in the studio bunker here at the Central.

    Where Projects Stand a Couple of Weeks into 2020.

    Time is flying by. It felt like it was New Year’s last week.

    It was two weeks ago.

    Pretty sure I’m stuck in an accelerated timestream.

    Anyway, I set out into 2020 with specific goals now that all my prelim work is pretty much done. (All discussed in my newsletter.)

    And so . . . here is where some projects stand a couple of weeks into 2020:

    Project Rebuild: First batch of second editions are my Undead World Trilogy. The new cover style–which looks incredible–is almost done. Layout to begin soon. Here is the original announcement.

    Patreon: New tiers and options to be added once some second editions come out. Gigantigator Death Machine is the current feature playing as a serial novel with a new installment every two weeks. This will run until May, if I counted out the installments correctly. A new serial novel will start up after this first one is done. Please go here to start reading the previous chapters so you’re ready for the next episode.

    Artwork: Putting the final touches on a commission. Have permission to share it on-line once the client receives it in the mail.

    Freelance: In the middle of a project for someone and still have my client that requires two days a week. (Which slows down my published work output but, hey, need to keep the lights on somehow.)

    New published work: This involves all the various projects I mentioned in previous blog posts and in the newsletter. As of this writing, the plan is to do a few second editions first then release something new then more second editions then new work, and so on. This plan keeps me at a pace I can manage, which in turn benefits you by giving you a pattern for 2020 and something to look forward to.

    YouTube: The channel is growing and content is going up at, on average, a video a week. Your subscription to the channel helps keep the writing and art machine running so please subscribe if you haven’t already.

    Daily blogging: Still on the Monday-to-Friday schedule. I’m doing my best to give you something each day that entertains or informs at least one person. Check back daily for new entries. If you check back and the blog hasn’t been updated, check back again later. Lately, my blogging hour has been shifting for various reasons.

    Vacation: Though I took a break over the Holidays, it wasn’t really a break. In the end, I had a few days for a breather because it took me until Boxing Day to finally slow down and just relax. Throw in some Holiday activities during that relax time and I didn’t end up having a genuine break. I was back at it on the 30th. So, things are in motion for a legit winter holiday, but by the time all is arranged, that won’t be until February sometime. Watch this space.

    Conventions and public appearances: One convention has been announced. I have irons in the fire in others and am waiting to hear back.

    Posted through my social channels this morning:

    “Hoping to find new inroads in the publishing world (books and comics) in 2020. I’m convinced the current standard system is terrible. That said, it’s up to creators to create the market, not companies. We need to get that straight first otherwise it’ll be same old, same old.”

    I stand by the idea that creators create the market. Read my essay, “Why I Quit the Publishing Industry and Opted to Just Make Books Instead,” to find out my thoughts on the current climate and my general attitude toward it. If you’re a creator reading this, please check out the essay. We’re not at the mercy of various companies to get our work out. They’re at your mercy to provide them work to distribute. They don’t have a business without you. Take that to heart. Stand strong. Make new roads. Find out new ways to share with your readers. You and your readers are the ones in control, not these companies.

    Okay. That’s all I’ve got for now. Thank you for checking in.

    See you tomorrow.


  • Appearance Announcement: Winnipeg Comiccon

    Winnipeg Comiccon

    Please note I will be tabling at the Winnipeg Comiccon on October 30 to November 1, 2020. You’ll find me and author Melinda Marshall in Artist Alley with a couple of tables full of monster and superhero books, comics, and art.

    This is the first show I’m booked for since taking a break from conventions and appearances in 2018-2019.

    I’m looking forward to it. See you there.


  • Recap Tunnel: 10 Accomplishments from the Past Decade

    Recap Tunnel 2019 No. 3

    Welcome to Recap Tunnel: 10 Accomplishments from the Past Decade.

    Recently, there was a thing going around on-line where you listed or said your accomplishments over the past decade.

    Here are ten of mine in no particular order:

    1) Published Canister X Comix Nos. 1 – 3
    2) Celebrated ten years of Axiom-man with the Axiom-man: Tenth-anniversary Special Edition (which includes a bonus short story, intro by A.P. Fuchs, and an essay)
    3) Was obscenely sick and had to go into obscurity for a season before coming back from the dead
    4) Co-ran a Kickstarter campaign with Auroraman creator Jeff Burton. This birthed Axiom-man/Auroraman: Frozen Storm in paperback, eBook, and a limited lettered hardcover edition
    5) As part of Project Rebirth, I launched a new channel on YouTube
    6) Did a whole ton of conventions and book signings
    7) Closed down the traditional publishing side of Coscom Entertainment and got back to publishing only my own work through this label (which I invented in the dark ages during high school)
    8) Made some massive changes to my personal life and lived to tell the tale
    9) Also as part of Project Rebirth, I launched a Patreon page that’s filled with a ton of content like a serial novel, videos, patron-only blog posts, essays, and behind-the-scenes secrets
    10) Moved into a new studio space

    There was a lot more that went down but I’ve probably talked about some of those things elsewhere on the blog or somewhere online or maybe in an interview. So here we are: Decade done. Time for a new one.

    Lots of plans are in place for 2020 and beyond.

    Reminder: I’m taking part in Smashwords’s year-end sale, which means my eBooks are 50% off at their site. You can grab one or more of them by going here. Thank you for your support.


  • New A.P. Fuchs Business Cards Unboxing

    My new business cards–printed by Vistaprint–came in along with return address labels for stuff shipping out of Axiom-man Central among other purposes. Take a look at this unboxing video showcase to see the new cards.

    Business cards are critical in the art world and I’ve been using them in one way or another since I published my first book back in 2003. I might have even had some before then. I can’t remember. Regardless, it still surprises me when I meet creators at conventions and they don’t have a card so I can follow up with them. Business cards are Publishing 101 so if you don’t have some of your own for whatever you do, better get going on that.

    Be sure to subscribe to the channel by going here so you don’t miss the latest video.

    Enjoy!

    Thanks.


  • Convention Basics: Five Tips to Make Your Book Stand Out

    c4displayThis article was originally published January 7, 2016 on the Operation Awesome Blog.

    With so many writers these days focusing all their marketing efforts on-line, they’re putting themselves in a corner and limiting their exposure. Off-line sales are where the bread and butter is at if you play your cards right.

    I’m talking conventions, which are basically glorified book signings.

    Since 2007, I’ve been tabling at Central Canada Comic Con here in Winnipeg, a giant comic book convention. This show is also a big part of my paycheck, and my books fit right in because I write nerdy stuff like monster stories, superhero fiction and sci-fi.

    A lot has been learned about having a successful show over the years. Here are some basics to get you started:

    1. Display

    Have an eye-catching display. When competing against so many other booths and tables, you need to stand out. Bring a tablecloth because not all shows provide them. Use signage, big ones, like 11”x17” set up on stands so folks catch sight of your book’s cover or what the deal of the day is. Want to really stand out? Get a big banner printed up, one you can put behind you. This can display your name and what you do. It can feature your book covers, a web address. Lots of options.

    By all means, lay your books flat if you want, but if you prop them up on book stands, all the better. It raises them above the table and draws the eye. Simple picture frame stands work fine. I use iPad ones because they compact better for transport.

    Have a series? Lay them out in order of reading.

    Write in multiple genres? Organize them as such on the table. Makes it easier to direct the customer to what’s what.

    2. Pricing

    Big sales point. Offer convention-only pricing. I do ten dollars a novel, five bucks a novella. I make sure the customer knows the convention is the only place to get the deal. Get my stuff at a store or on-line and you’ll pay more. Everyone likes saving money.

    You can also bundle your books. Have a series? Instead of three books at ten beans each, how about three for twenty-five? You can also do a buy-two-get-one-free thing. Whatever works for you provided you come out in the black all things considered.

    3. Book Stock

    Better to bring more books than necessary. Nothing worse than selling out and having someone want something. With time and experience, you’ll learn your top sellers and will stock up accordingly. For a first-time show, I recommend at least fifteen copies of each title. If you only have one book out, bring at least twenty.

    4. Miscellaneous Items

    Scatter bookmarks and business cards around your table. If someone doesn’t buy something, at least you can send them off with a card for a potential after sale.

    5. You

    Be courteous, be nice, give the customer the time of day. Don’t be a fake. Answer their questions honestly. Be active. Don’t squirrel yourself away behind your table. Say hi to people as they walk past. Smile. And, please, don’t do the lonely-author thing where you sit there staring at folks, the look in your eyes saying, “Please come talk to me.” Just be cool. Relax. With time and experience, you’ll find what works for you in your personable approach. Ultimately, be yourself. This isn’t a show.

    There’s so much to expand on regarding the above, but space doesn’t allow it. Why not sound off in the comments below and exchange tips and tricks with your fellow authors? I’ll tune in when I can and do the same.