• Tag Archives anime
  • Canister X Book Review #8: MegaMan NT Warrior, Vol. 1 by Ryo Takamisaki

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    MegaMan NT Warrior, Vol. 1
    by Ryo Takamisaki
    5 out of 5

    In the year 200X, the whole world is connected to the Cyber Network. People jack in to the Net using handheld PCs called PETs, and each person has their own artificially intelligent avatar called a NetNavi.

    Lan Hikari’s is MegaMan, a truly sophisticated and powerful NetNavi programmed by his father.

    Like any fifth grader in DenTech City, Lan passes the time by having NetBattles with his fellow classmates, pitting MegaMan up against any who would challenge him. The problem is, NetBattling is illegal unless you have a special license. But that’s only part of the Lan’s and MegaMan’s problem. An evil organization called World Three is infecting computers with sinister viruses with the hope of one day taking over the world.

    Lan jacks in and sends MegaMan to stop these viruses before it’s too late.

    This manga, which is similar to the anime of the same name, was a blast to read. Ryo Takamisaki’s storytelling is topnotch—quick, exciting and a whirlwind of adventure from beginning to end. His art is your classic manga but with a cartoon flare, and the dialogue is perfect, conveying to us everything we need to know about the story, without it coming off as long-winded explanations for “what’s happening.”

    The banter between Lan and MegaMan is pricelss, even better than in the anime.

    This volume also contains a very intriguing cliffhanger ending and fun bonus story.

    Recommended.


  • Canister X Book Review #7: Rurouni Kenshin: Meiji Swordsman Romantic Story, Vol. 1 by Nobuhiro Watsuki

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    Rurouni Kenshin: Meiji Swordsman Romantic Story, Vol. 1
    by Nobuhiro Watsuki
    4 out of 5

    A mysterious warrior named Hitokiri Battôsai arose in Kyoto 140 years ago. A fiercesome warrior, he slew countless men, his efforts helping bring to a close the Bakumatsu era and bringing in the age of the Meiji.

    Then he disappeared.

    In the 11th year of the Meiji, a rurouni—a vagabond—named Himura Kenshin surfaces in Tokyo and befriends the spunky Kaoru, the owner of a student-less dojo.

    With the aid of young new friend Yahiko, a boy wanting to be a samurai himself, Kenshin and Kaoru must ward off those looking to kill them.

    And so the story begins . . .

    Despite its label being a “romantic comedy,” this is by far the most serious out of the manga I read. Nobuhiro Watsuki has crafted an incredible tale, an important story, one that had captured my full attention the second Kenshin showed up in Tokyo (which is pretty much the first page of the book).

    His art is stellar. The detail is astounding (even after the first 22 pages when the art goes from ultra detailed to “just” super detailed). His rendering of Japan from 140 years ago is believable, each panel transporting you directly to the past.

    The big deal about this book is the fight sequences, each chapter in this volume containing at least one battle. I’ve never seen action like this before—so huge, so intense, so detailed, so explosive, with speed-lines everywhere—AMAZING!

    This volumes also includes a special bonus story that was originally published about a year before the now-complete-twenty-eight-volume series began.

    This is a great opening story to what is sure to be a fantastic saga this reviewer looks forward to finishing. (I’m also now eager to check out the anime for this.)


  • Canister X Movie Review #108: Sailor Moon R (2000)

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    Canister X Movie Review #108: Sailor Moon R (2000)
    Runtime 60 min.
    3 out of 5

    When Darien’s/Tuxedo Mask’s lost friend, Fiore, resurfaces, trouble abounds and it’s up to the Sailor Scouts to come to the rescue.

    To make matters worse, Fiore kidnaps Darien. He is also responsible for the massive meteor/flower-planet that’s on a collision course for Earth.

    Testing the bonds of friendship and reaching deep inside to find their inner strengths, the Sailor Scouts must come together to thwart the threat before it’s too late.

    The story’s straight forward, basically a bad guy coming to get his friend back but causes trouble because he’s under the influence of an evil flower so Sailor Moon and the gang need to stop him. But the simplicity works for the film.

    This was a fun anime—light, cute, even, um, flowery. It’s loaded with sparkles and glitters and shiny objects, very “happy” compared to most anime this reviewer’s seen.

    There’s an air of wonder to this film, most notably when the Sailor Scouts activate their powers and Sailor Moon calls out, “Mooon Crystaaalll Poweeeerrr!”

    This is an anime to watch if you’re looking for something with razzle-dazzle, cute humor and a whole lot of girl power.


  • Canister X Movie Review #107: Black Cat (Vol. 2) – The Catastrophe (2007)

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    Black Cat Vol. 2: The Catastrophe (2007)
    Run time 100 min.
    5 out of 5

    # 05: The Departing Cat

    Black Cat leaves Chronos. Creed approaches him with an interesting opportunity. Sephira shows up to make sure Black Cat’s departure is permanent.

    # 06: The Cat Under Fire

    Sven and Eve’s hiding place is discovered. Saya goes to meet Black Cat at a carnival only to run into Creed instead. Black Cat’s life changes forever.

    # 07: The Wounded Cat

    Black Cat is laid up in Sven’s hideout, healing. Eve offers Black Cat a very special gift. Business isn’t finished with Chronos, who has just sent No. 7 to kill Eve.

    # 08: The Sweeping Cat

    Black Cat, Sven and Eve go after the bounty on Igor Planter, but before they do, they run into an old friend.

    This volume packs a wallop in the emotional department, especially in the episode, “The Cat Under Fire.” All time seemed to stop during one of its scenes. This is the DVD where things change in the series, both in character and in flow and becomes even more so in line with Kentaro Yabuki’s manga.

    The humor, mostly coming from Sven, is laugh-out-loud funny. Each character also has their moment under the spotlight to give their witty observation of the situation or an outlandish complaint to make you chuckle.

    The “manga moments” return in this DVD, moments where the characters go from being drawn standard anime style to very cartoony to emphasize an emotion then back to normal again.

    Groundwork for further storytelling was also laid in this volume while a couple other threads were wrapped up.

    I can’t wait to see what happens next.